Daily Devotional Thoughts
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All scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the New King James Version®. Copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc. Used by permission. All rights reserved.  This Week’s Study: Romans 7:7-8:4 Monday - The law defines sin. What shall we say then? Is the law sin? Certainly not! On the contrary, I would not have known sin except through the law. For I would not have known covetousness unless the law had said, "YOU SHALL NOT COVET" (Romans 7:7) Paul makes a highly technical argument in these verses.  He asks in essence, is the law sin?  Or did the law cause sin? No, on the contrary, the law points out sin. “I would not have known sin except through the law.” The purpose of the law is not to save us. It does not justify, or make us right before God.  No, the law brings the knowledge of sin.  It defines right and wrong.   “Therefore by the deeds of the law no flesh will be justified in His sight, for by the law is the knowledge of sin” (Romans 3:20). No, the law is not sin, “the law is holy, and the commandment holy and just and good” Romans 7:12. In God’s mercy we are not left to wonder what is right and what is wrong.  God’s law clearly marks out the path of righteousness.  Thanks God for that! Tuesday - God delivers me “from this body of death.” For we know that the law is spiritual, but I am carnal, sold under sin. For what I am doing, I do not understand. For what I will to do, that I do not practice; but what I hate, that I do (Romans 7:14-15). In your Christian walk, can you relate to Paul’s words here? Can you relate to the pull between the carnal nature versus the holiness of God’s law? Paul writes, I “know that the law is spiritual, but I am carnal, sold under sin.”  I don’t understand.  I will to do right, to live a righteous life, but I end up doing what I hate! “For I know that in me (that is, in my flesh) nothing good dwells; for to will is present with me, but how to perform what is good I do not find. For the good that I will to do, I do not do; but the evil I will not to do, that I practice” (Romans 7:18-19). For I delight in the law of God according to the inward man. But I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin which is in my members (Romans 7:22-23). O wretched man that I am! Who will deliver me from this body of death? I thank God--through Jesus Christ our Lord! So then, with the mind I myself serve the law of God, but with the flesh the law of sin (Romans 7:24-25) Thank God we aren’t left in this terrible place of continual failure.  Thank God we aren’t left in the slavery of sin. “O wretched man that I am! Who will deliver me from this body of death? I thank God--through Jesus Christ our Lord!”  Thank God for His love and for Jesus Christ, the one who delivers me from this body of death! Wednesday  - This body of death. O wretched man that I am! Who will deliver me from this body of death? I thank God--through Jesus Christ our Lord! So then, with the mind I myself serve the law of God, but with the flesh the law of sin (Romans 7:24-25). “O wretched man that I am! Who will deliver me from this body of death?”  What an apt description of the slavery of sin: “this body of death!”  Adam Clarke comments on this verse and describes the ancient tyrant’s body-of-death form of punishment. This affecting account is finished more impressively by the groans of the wounded captive. Having long maintained a useless conflict against innumerable hosts and irresistible might, he is at last wounded and taken prisoner; and to render his state more miserable, is not only encompassed by the slaughtered, but chained to a dead body; for there seems to be here an allusion to an ancient custom of certain tyrants, who bound a dead body to a living man, and obliged him to carry it about, till the contagion from the putrid mass took away his life! Virgil paints this in all its horrors, in the account he gives of the tyrant Mezentius. Aeneid, lib. viii. ver. 485. Quid memorem infandas caedes? quid facta tyranni? Mortua quin etiam jungebat corpora Vivis, Componens manibusque manus, atque oribus ora; Tormenti genus! et sanie taboque fluentes Complexu in misero, longa sic morte necabat. What tongue can such barbarities record, Or count the slaughters of his ruthless sword? ‘Twas not enough the good, the guiltless bled, Still worse, he bound the living to the dead: These, limb to limb, and face to face, he joined; O! monstrous crime, of unexampled kind! Till choked with stench, the lingering wretches lay, And, in the loathed embraces, died away! Pitt. Servius remarks, in his comment on this passage, that sanies, mortui est; tabo, viventis scilicet sanguis: “the sanies, or putrid ichor, from the dead body, produced the tabes in the blood of the living.” Roasting, burning, racking, crucifying, etc., were nothing when compared to this diabolically invented punishment. We may naturally suppose that the cry of such a person would be, Wretched man that I am, who shall deliver me from this dead body? And how well does this apply to the case of the person to whom the apostle refers! A body - a whole mass of sin and corruption, was bound to his soul with chains which he could not break; and the mortal contagion, transfused through his whole nature, was pressing him down to the bitter pains of an eternal death. He now finds that the law can afford him no deliverance; and he despairs of help from any human being; but while he is emitting his last, or almost expiring groan, the redemption by Christ Jesus is proclaimed to him; and, if the apostle refers to his own case, Ananias unexpectedly accosts him with - Brother Saul! the Lord Jesus, who appeared unto thee in the way, hath sent me unto thee, that thou mightest receive thy sight, and be filled with the Holy Ghost. He sees then an open door of hope, and he immediately, though but in the prospect of this deliverance, returns God thanks for the well- grounded hope which he has of salvation, through Jesus Christ our Lord.(Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible: Romans 7:24). Thursday  - Present your members as slaves of righteousness. There is therefore now no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus, who do not walk according to the flesh, but according to the Spirit. For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has made me free from the law of sin and death (Romans 8:1-2). There is therefore now no condemnation. . .  the “therefore” points back to the struggle Paul defines in Romans 7, the previous chapter.  Paul describes it this way: “For I delight in the law of God according to the inward man. But I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin which is in my members” (Romans 7:22-25).  After describing the terrible struggle going on in our lives, the struggle between right living versus the pull of the carnal nature, Paul ends chapter 7 by exclaiming: “O wretched man that I am! Who will deliver me from this body of death? I thank God--through Jesus Christ our Lord!” (Romans 7:24-25a). God doesn’t leave us in that terrible place of sorrow and sadness, the “body of death” as Paul aptly puts it.  Today’s text informs “there is therefore now no condemnation to those are in Christ Jesus,, who do not walk according to the flesh, but according to the Spirit.”  The secret is this: the moment by moment choices we make determine our destiny.  As we choose to walk “according to the Spirit,” we are not condemned.  We will doubtless stumble along the way, the carnal desires will exert their pulls on our lives, but as we choose to walk in the Spirit rather than according to the flesh, we are not condemned.  Isn’t that good news?  You can go free today!  Uncondemned and with continual growth toward the goal of right living.  that is God’s gift for you today. There is therefore now no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus, who do not walk according to the flesh, but according to the Spirit. For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has made me free from the law of sin and death” (Romans 8:1-2). Friday/Weekend - While we were still sinners Christ died for us. For what the law could not do in that it was weak through the flesh, God did by sending His own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, on account of sin: He condemned sin in the flesh, that the righteous requirement of the law might be fulfilled in us who do not walk according to the flesh but according to the Spirit (Romans 8:3-4). God sent His own Son to rescue us!  While the law defines sin, attempting salvation by perfect obedience to the law won’t work!  The only solution for the sin problem is the solution God provided: Jesus Christ, God the son, came to this earth, and lived amongst the degradation sin has brought to this planet and it’s inhabitants.  And yet without sin! For we do not have a High Priest who cannot sympathize with our weaknesses, but was in all points tempted as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly to the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy and find grace to help in time of need (Hebrews 4:15- 16). He was tempted in all points like as are we, yet He lived without sin!  Since He lived here among us, He understands.  He was tempted in all points.  His sinless life not only condemns sin in the flesh but provides a way out for each one of us! He understands our problems. “Let us therefore come boldly to the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy and find grace to help in time of need.” Press <Control>+D to bookmark this page 2010-2012 Marvin Glass, Inc. And now back to more great Southern Gospel Music!